Presse - TV - Radios


He’s ever-ready to step forward when the clatter of the E Street Band subsides or an important sub-hook needs stating. As drummer Max Weinberg told Guitar Player in 1988, “Garry gets down low and between the notes, which is a very funky place to be.” After 37 years behind Springsteen, the soft-spoken veteran knows everything about one of America’s greatest rock & roll institutions.

Born in Detroit, Michigan on October 27, 1949, Tallent moved around the South with his parents and six siblings, before the family settled in Neptune City, New Jersey, in 1964. By then Garry had tried flute, clarinet, violin, guitar, tuba, and upright bass, while keeping an ear to early rock & roll. With the British Invasion of self-contained groups underway, bass playing quickly became a commodity in Jersey Shore bands. Garry, who was playing guitar in one local ensemble, borrowed neighbor Southside Johnny Lyon’s Hagstrom bass to join another band. Soon afterward, he bought a Framus Star bass and began relating to the radio rumble of Paul McCartney, Bill Wyman, Chas Chandler, Duck Dunn, and James Jamerson.

Tallent’s true music school, however, was Asbury Park’s legendary Upstage Club, where he teamed with drummer Bobby Williams as the house rhythm section. “It was great on-the-spot training to get up there with an artist you’ve never met and figure out how to entertain for a set,” remembers Garry, who played the club’s Silvertone bass (or a Danelectro he put together while working at the manufacturer’s Neptune City factory). Future bandmates Little Steven Van Zandt, Clarence Clemons, and Danny Federici became regulars at the club. So did Bruce Springsteen, who started a band with Little Steven on bass; when Steven switched to guitar in January 1971, he recommended Tallent. Within a year, Springsteen’s E Street Band was in place for the recording of his debut, Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J.

How has the E Street Band changed over the years?
Musically, everyone has gotten better—more adept at their instruments and more knowledgeable. Personally, I’ve pared down my playing over time. When the band gets together, we all play a certain way that we would never play anywhere else. If I played at a Nashville session the way I do with the E Street Band, I’d never be invited back! It’s just a different, more aggressive way of playing. Still, we hadn’t played together for four years, so on the first day of the Magic sessions it took a minute to get back to that place.

Have you changed any classic Springsteen bass parts?
Oh, sure. We have over a hundred songs to draw from. I wouldn’t be able to go back and learn all those bass lines; even if I could, they were just my initial parts in the studio, which often changed a week later when performing them live. There are certain parts that have to be there, but generally I’m playing something different every night. This constant state of evolving is what keeps the band fresh.

What was it like working with bass-playing producer Brendan O’Brien on the last two Springsteen albums?
Well, I had the impression that nobody ever really listens to the bass, which gave me a sort of freedom [laughs]. But Brendan has given me notes and ideas; he’s really hands-on. A good example is “Radio Nowhere” [from Magic]: I was playing with my fingers, resulting in more of a Motown feel, and it wasn’t working for him. I suggested a pick, which gave it the edge he was looking for. That’s a decision I never would have thought to make on my own. Brendan has us record basic tracks first, with myself, Max, Roy [Bittan] on piano, and Bruce on acoustic guitar. It really lets us focus on the rhythm section, and has resulted in the best-sounding record we’ve ever made. Before Brendan, we had always recorded as a band, and the focus would immediately go to overdubs and solos. If I messed up but it was decided to be the best take, I was out of luck. I’ve had to learn more mistakes over the years... [Laughs.]

You sound busier with drummer Vini Lopez on the earlier records than you do on discs with Max.
We were what I would call wild and innocent then, listening to Cream and the Allman Brothers, and throwing everything at the wall to see what would stick. Vini had a naturally busy, loping style, so I was more active to keep up. Plus, I was a bit of a rebel. Producer John Landau was always trying to get me to lock with the bass drum. Even later in Nashville, Steve Earle would tease me, saying, ‘I love your bass lines—you have no regard for what the kick is doing.’ My approach was always to go along with the kick without being married to it, to find my own part in the song.
When Max came into the band, we kind of molded him into the drummer we wanted him to be. We gave him records with everyone from Keith Moon to Roger Hawkins, and he absorbed it all. We’ve created our own way of playing together, with a less-is-more focus that’s second nature.

How do you typically come up with your parts for Bruce’s songs?
Bruce usually introduces a tune by singing and playing it on guitar, so I have complete freedom to come up with a part. I watch his hands, listen, and react; that’s what adds excitement and freshness to the part. My first inclination is often melodic, but the role of the bass is to bridge the rhythm and melody. I figure that my part is there to make the song more reachable; I’ll do whatever it takes to make it feel good, sit right, and get the listener to respond.

What are your favorite Bruce tracks?
As time goes on and I get more distance, I like them all. On the other hand, I’ve always been my own worst critic, so I’m not totally satisfied with any of them. It’s really about the song, not the bass; to me, the better songs had the better bass lines. When pinned, I always name “Point Blank” [from The River]; it’s a very emotional song and it stirred those emotions in me. The bass and Bruce’s voice are the predominant elements of the track, and with a band as big as ours I don’t get to play that role often. I also like “It’s Hard to Be a Saint in New York City” [from The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle]. I’ve been asked about “Hungry Heart”; I kind of heard it as a staccato tuba part when I came up with the bass line. Ultimately, you wind up liking the ones you don’t do as often.

Let’s talk about your technique.
I pluck with two alternating fingers, or sometimes just one. I use a pick about ten percent of the time, if the sound is called for. I’ve also been muting the strings since hearing that way back on Eddie Cochran records. I mute with my left hand and with my right palm, if I’m using a pick. And I like to move my plucking hand between the neck and the bridge to get various tones. When I first got into the studio with Bruce and realized how under the microscope everyone’s playing was, I felt I needed some help with my technique—so in the late ’70s I took some lessons with Jerry Jemmott, who had an ad in the Village Voice. He was great; he gave me right-hand warm-ups and exercises to make my playing even and consistent. From there, I practiced with a VU meter, making sure I could keep the needle in a steady range. But I’m no great technician; I never took to slapping or to 5- or 6-string basses. I did get into fretless after hearing Pino Palladino all over the radio in the ’80s.

What led to your move to Nashville, in 1989?
The E Street Band had just been put on extended hiatus, and my feeling was that rock & roll was stagnating. It seemed like country was poised to take the creative mantle, so I made the move. My friend [guitarist] Kenny Vaughan taught me the ropes and the rules, and got me going on sessions; one of my first was filling in for [Elton John sideman turned session player] Dee Murray, who had become pretty ill by that point. I learned the Number System and worked my way into demo and master sessions. Nashville is an amazing city, chock full of great musicians; on bass alone, that includes talents as diverse as Michael Rhodes, Joey Spampinato, and the late, great Roy Huskey Jr., all of whom I became close with. I initially told my family we’d give it five years, and we ended up staying for 18.

How did Nashville tie into your producing career?
That actually started in New Jersey; I was always fascinated by recording, so I put together a studio in the mid ’80s and began by engineering sessions for bands. Before long, I was working on the arrangements, too, and that led to producing. When I got to Nashville I only produced pet projects that were outside the norm, like rock-edged records by the Delevantes, Kevin Gordon, and Dwayne Jarvis, or Greg Trooper, whose album hit No. 1 on the newly formed Americana chart. I enjoyed being on the other side of the glass and I still do, but it never replaced playing for me.

What lies ahead?
The tour with Bruce goes through the summer. We have another album’s worth of material recorded, but no word yet on a release or future tours. Since moving to Montana two years ago I’ve been hired to do some bass tracks via the Internet, although it’s not my favorite way to work. But life is good; I’ve had a blessed career. My lone regret is not having had more serious musical training. I’m trying to do that now, playing more piano and guitar and studying theory. If I had to offer one bit of advice, it would be to take advantage of the many resources out there and learn everything you can about music. It will help you to become the best you can be.

Other Bass Tallents: Garry's Personal Pantheon

James Jamerson “There’s James and then there’s everybody else. When I was doing my track for Allan Slutsky’s Standing in the Shadows of Motown book, he sent me a cassette with a lot of the other guest bassists playing Jamerson lines. I kept it in the car, and my wife, who is not a musician, would drive around totally digging on it—no vocals, just bass! That shows you how engaging his playing was.”

Jaco Pastorius “Jaco was a musical genius. We became close and hung out a bunch of times. One night we were at the Lone Star in the Village, watching Jerry Lee Lewis. Jerry decided he wanted to play guitar, so Jaco went over to the piano and I got on bass and we played for quite a while. It broke my heart when he died; he was such a sweet guy.”

Rick Danko “In Nashville, I was in a five-piece rhythm section called the Long Players. We would learn a classic album start to finish, and then hire singers and go to a club to perform it one time only. We did over 20 albums, from the Beatles and Stones to Van Morrison and the Who. The biggest surprise was learning Rick Danko’s parts with The Band. I’d always loved him, but I thought of him mainly as a singer. Well, he was a fantastic bassist, from his note choices to where he put them.”

Gear

Basses with the Boss Spector NS-2J custom short-scale (main bass); ’07 Gretsch Thunder Jet; fretless ’65 Guild Starfire; ’60s Guild M-85; e-size unknown 19th-century German upright

Basses on Magic ’63 Fender Jazz Bass, ’63 Fender Precision Bass with flats, Jerry Jones Longhorn, Brendan O’Brien’s ’64 P-Bass

Strings Pyramid Gold nickel flats, La Bella 0760M “Jamerson” flatwounds

Picks Dunlop Jazz 3XL, felt ukulele pick

Live Shure UHF M4 wireless from each bass into Ashly LX-308B line mixer, then Radial J48 DI to sound system, monitored through Sennheiser wireless in-ear monitors; Hartke HA4000 head and 4200 Professional Series cabinet (used for soundcheck and as monitoring backup to in-ears, but turned off for shows)

Studio Aguilar DB 680 tube preamp, Demeter SSC-1 Silent Cabinet (1x12), Ampeg B-15S 60-watt combo amp

Selected Discography

With Bruce Springsteen (all on Columbia)
Magic
The Rising
Tracks
Ghost of Tom Joad
Tunnel of Love
Live/1975–85
Born in the U.S.A.
The River
Darkness on the Edge of Town
Born to Run
The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle
Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J

With Little Steven & the Disciples of Soul
Men Without Women, EMI

With Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes
Messin’ With the Blues, Leroy Better Days, Impact

With Steve Forbert
Mission of the Crossroad Palms, Giant

With Ian Hunter
You’re Never Alone With a Schizophrenic, Razor and Tie

With Gary U.S. Bonds
Dedication/On the Line, Gott Discs

With Emmylou Harris
Brand New Dance, Reprise

With Delevantes
Long About That Time, Rounder

With Randy Scruggs (and Johnny Cash)
Crown of Jewels, Warner Bros

With Steve Earle
I Feel Alright, Warner Bros

With Billy Joe Shaver
The Earth Rolls On, New West

With Robert Earl Keen Jr.
A Bigger Piece of the Sky, Sugar Hill

With Sonny Burgess
Sonny Burgess, Rounder

With Paul Burlison
Train Kept a-Rollin’, Sweetfish

With Solomon Burke
Nashville, Shout Factory

With P.F. Sloan
Sailover, Hightone

With Sass Jordan
Get What You Give, Horizon

With Jim Lauderdale
Honey Songs, Yep Roc


Garry Tallent: Quatre Décennies de Basse pour le Boss

Il est toujours prêt à se porter volontaire quand le barouf du E Street Band s'essouffle ou quand un artiste important a besoin d'aide. Comme le raconte le batteur Max Weinberg à Guitar Player en 1988, « Garry va au fond des choses, et entre les notes, ce qui est une place très funky ». Après 37 ans derrière Springsteen, ce vétéran à la voix douce connait tout de l'une des plus grandes institutions rock d'Amérique.

Né à Détroit, Michigan, le 27 octobre 1949, Tallent déménagea vers le sud avec ses parents et ses six frères et sœurs, avant que sa famille ne s'installe à Neptune City, New Jersey, en 1964. à cette époque, Garry s'est essayé à la flute, à la clarinette, au violon, à la guitare, au tuba et à la contrebasse, tout en gardant une oreille sur le rock'n'roll naissant. En pleine British Invasion avec ses groupes flegmatiques, jouer de la basse devint rapidement quelque chose de très recherché dans les groupes de la côte du New Jersey. Garry, qui avait joué de la guitare dans un orchestre local, emprunta la basse Hagstrom de son voisin, Southside Johnny Lyon pour se joindre à un autre groupe. Peu de temps après, il acheta une basse Framus Star et commença à se connecter au ronronnement radiophonique de Paul McCartney, Bill Wyman, Chas Chandler, Duck Dunn et James Jamerson.

La véritable école de musique de Tallent, toutefois, était le légendaire Upstage Club d'Asbury Park où il faisait équipe avec le batteur, Bobby Williams, en tant que section rythmique maison. « C'était un super entrainement aux feux de la rampe de se retrouver là à jouer avec un artiste que t'as jamais rencontré et de comprendre comment animer le set », se rappelle Garry, qui jouait avec la basse Silverstone du club (ou en association avec une Danelectro tout en travaillant dans l'usine de son fabricant à Neptune City). Ses futurs camarades, Little Steven Van Zandt, Clarence Clemons et Danny Federici, étaient des habitués du club. Tout comme Bruce Springsteen, qui a monté un groupe avec Little Steven à la basse; quand ce dernier a laissé tomber la basse pour la guitare en janvier 1971, il recommanda Tallent à Springsteen. En un an, le E Street Band était prêt pour enregistrer son premier album, Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J.

Comment le E Street Band a-t-il évolué au fil du temps?
Musicalement, nous nous sommes améliorés- nous sommes plus dévoués à nos instruments et npus nous y connaissons mieux. Personnellement, ma manière de jouer s'est concise au cours des ans. Lorsque le groupe se retrouve, on joue tous d'une manière particulière qu'on ne jouerait jamais ailleurs. Si je jouais lors d'une session à Nashville de la même manière qu'avec le E Street Band, on ne me réinviterait pas! C'est simplement une manière différente de jouer, plus aggressive. Enfin, nous n'avions pas joué ensemble depuis quatre ans, alors le premier jour des sessions pour Magic, il nous a fallu un moment avant de reprendre nos places.

Avez-vous changé des parties de basse de certaines chansons de Springsteen?
Oh oui, bien sûr. Nous avons une centaine de chansons à jouer. Je ne serais pas capable de toutes les reprendre et d'apprendre toutes ces lignes de basses; même si je le pouvais, ce sont juste mes parties initiales en studio, qui souvent changent une semaine plus tard quand on les joue en live. Il y a certaines parties qui doivent être présentes, mais en général, je joue quelque chose de différent chaque soir. C'est cet état d'évolution permanente qui garde le groupe en vie.

A quoi ressemblait votre travail sur les deux derniers albums de Springsteen avec le producteur, Brendan O'Brien, qui lui-même joue de la basse?
Eh bien, j'avais l'impression que personne n'avait jamais vraiment fait attention à la basse, ce qui me donnait une certaine liberté [rires]. Mais Brendan m'a donné des notes et des idées; il est vraiment direct. « Radio Nowhere » [de Magic]en est un bon exemple: je jouais avec mes doigts, conséquence d'un ressenti plus Motown, mais ça ne marchait pas avec lui. Il m'a conseillé de jouer avec un médiator, qui a donné à la chanson le son qu'il cherchait. Je n'y aurais jamais pensé de moi-même. Brendan fait d'abord un enregistrement de base, avec Max, Roy [Bittan] au piano, Bruce à la guitare acoustique et moi-même. Ce que nous permet de nous concentrer sur la section rythmique, et a pour résultat un album qui a le meilleur son que nous ayons jamais réalisé. Avant Brendan, nous avions toujours enregistré tous ensemble en même temps comme un groupe, et l'attention se portait immédiatement sur les overdubs et les solos. Si j'avais foiré mais que c'était la meilleure prise, pas moyen de revenir en arrière. J'ai dû en apprendre plus de mes erreurs au fil du temps... [rires]

Vous paraissiez plus dynamique avec Vini Lopez sur les premiers albums qu'après avec Max?
Nous étions à l'époque, je dirais, wild et innocent, à écouter Cream et les Allman Brothers, et à faire un peu n'importe quoi pour voir si ça collait dans l'ensemble. Vini était d'un naturel actif avec un style ample, alors que je faisais de mon mieux pour tenir son rythme. En plus, j'étais un peu plus rebelle. Jon Landau, le producteur, essayait toujours de me cantonner au schéma basse-batterie. Même plus tard à Nashville, Steve Earle me taquinait en disant « j'adore tes lignes de basses- tu te fous de ce que peut bien faire la batterie ». Mon approche a toujours été d'accompagner le batteur sans y être marié, de trouver mon rôle à moi dans la chanson.
Quand Max est arrivé dans le groupe, nous l'avons forgé en ce que nous voulions. Nous lui avons donné des albums allant de Keith Moon à Roger Hawkins, et il a tout absorbé. Nous avons créé notre propre manière de jouer, avec comme seconde nature, less is more (ndlt: moins, c'est mieux].

Comment faites-vous pour adapter vos parties de basse aux chansons de Bruce?
En principe, Bruce présente une chanson en la chantant et en la jouant à la guitare, donc j'ai une liberté totale en ce qui concerne mes partitions. J'observe ses mains, j'écoute et je réagis; c'est ce qui apporte excitation et fraicheur à mon jeu. Ma première idée est souvent mélodique, mais le rôle de la basse, c'est de faire le lien entre le rythme et la mélodie. Je pense que mon rôle est là de rendre la chanson plus accessible; je ferai n'importe quoi pour la rendre agréable à écouter, compréhensible pour l'auditeur et qu'il puisse y réagir.

Quelles sont vos chansons préférées de Bruce?
Avec le temps et le recul, je les aime toutes. D'autre part, j'ai toujours été le pire critique pour ce qui me concerne, alors je ne suis satisfait d'aucune. Ça a avoir avec la chanson, pas avec la basse; pour moi, les meilleures chansons ont les meilleures lignes de basse. Quitte à tout choisir, je nomme toujours « Point Blank » [de The River]; c'est une chanson pleine d'émotions et elle remue ces émotions en moi. La basse et la voix de Bruce sont des éléments prédominants de cette chanson, et avec un groupe aussi grand que le nôtre je n'ai pas souvent la chance de jouer un tel rôle. J'aime aussi « It's Hard to Be a Saint in New York City » (ndlt: sic!) [de The Wild, the Innocent and The E Street Shuffle] (ndlt: re-sic!). On m'a posé la même question pour « Hungry Heart »; j'ai tendance à l'écouter comme une partie de tuba staccato lorsque j'arrive avec cette ligne de basse. En fin de compte, on se retrouve à aimer celles qu'on joue moins souvent.

Parlons maintenant de technique.
Je pince les cordes avec deux doigts en alternant, ou parfois avec un seul. J'utilise un médiator environ 10% du temps, si l'occasion s'y prête. J'assourdis aussi les cordes depuis que j'écoute des albums d'Eddie Cochran. Je les assourdis avec ma main gauche et ma paume droite, si j'utilise un médiator. Et j'aime bien bouger la main qui pince les cordes entre le manche et le chevalet pour obtenir des variations de ton. Quand je suis entré pour la première fois en studio avec Bruce et réalisé combien le jeu de chacun était décortiqué, j'ai senti que ma technique avait besoin d'un peu d'aide- alors à la fin des années 70, j'ai pris quelques leçons avec Jerry Jemmott, qui avait mis une pub dans le Village Voice. Il était super; il m'appris des échauffements pour la main droite et des exercices pour rendre mon jeu plus constant et régulier. À partir de là, je me suis exercé avec un VU-mètre pour être sûr que l'aiguille ne s'affolerait pas. Mais je ne suis pas un bon technicien; je n'ai jamais réussi à faire du slapping ou à jouer de la basse à 5 ou 6 cordes. Mais j'ai réussi à jouer de la basse fretless après avoir entendu Pino Palladino tout le temps à la radio dans les années 80.

Qu'est-ce-qui vous a poussé à déménager à Nashville en 1989?
Le E Street Band avait été mis sur pause pour un bon bout de temps, et mon état d'esprit était que le rock'n'roll stagnait. Il semblait que la country était tenue d'incarner la créativité, alors j'ai déménagé. Mon ami [guitarist] Kenny Vaughan m'a enseigné les ficelles et les règles, et m'a emmené à des sessions; une de mes premières collaborations était de prendre la place de Dee Murray [collègue d'Elton John devenu musicien de studio], qui était tombé malade à l'époque. J'ai appris le Number System1 et me suis débrouillé pendant les démos et les masterisations. Nashville est une ville étonnante, archipleine de grands musiciens; juste à la basse, qui comprend des talents aussi divers que mes amis, Michael Rhodes, Joey Spampinato, et le défunt et grand Roy Huskey Jr.. J'ai d'abord dis à ma famille qu'on y resterait 5 ans et finalement ça fait 18 ans qu'on y est.

Comment Nashville s'est-elle combinée à votre carrière de producteur?
Elle a en fait commencé dans le New Jersey; j'ai toujours été fasciné par le fait d'enregistrer, alors j'ai monté un studio au milieu des années 80 et j'ai commencé à faire office d'ingénieur pour des groupes. Avant longtemps, je travaillais sur les arrangements, aussi, et ça a mené à la production. Quand je suis arrivé à Nashville, j'ai seulement produit ses projets personnels qui étaient en marge de la norme comme des albums limite rock des Delevantes, de Kevin Gordon et Dwayne Jarvis, ou de Greg Trooper, dont l'album est numéro 1 des tout nouveaux charts Americana. J'ai aimé être de l'autre côté du miroir et j'aime toujours ça, mais ça ne remplacera jamais la basse pour moi.

Et la suite?
La tournée avec Bruce dure tout l'été. Nous avons un autre album avec du nouveau matériel, mais rien encore sur une sortie ou d'éventuelles tournées. Depuis que j'ai déménagé dans le Montana il y a deux ans, j'ai été embauché pour faire quelques parties à la basse via Internet, bien que ce ne soit pas ma manière préférée de travailler. Mais la vie est belle: ma carrière a été bénie. Mon seul regret est de ne pas avoir eu une vraie éducation musicale. J'essaie de faire ça maintenant, jouer plus au piano et à la guitare, et d'étudier la théorie. Si je devais donner un conseil, ça serait de profiter des nombreuses ressources qu'on a et d'apprendre tout ce qui est possible d'apprendre sur la musique. Ça sera d'une grande aide pour atteindre le plus haut niveau possible.

Autres talents de la basse: le Panthéon personnel de Garry

James Jamerson “Il y a James et puis il y a les autres. Quand j'écrivais un texte pour le livre d'Allan Slutsky, Standing in the Shadows of Motown, il m'a envoyé une cassette où beaucoup de bassistes jouaient les lignes de Jamerson. Je l'ai gardée dans la voiture, et ma femme, qui n'est pas musicienne, avait l'habitude de conduire totalement absorbée par sa musique-aucune parole, juste de la basse! Ça montre bien combien il était impliqué dans son jeu de basse.”

Jaco Pastorius “Jaco était un génie de la musique. On est devenu proches et on a pas mal trainé ensemble. Une nuit, alors que nous étions au Lone Star dans le Village à regarder Jerry Lee Lewis, Jerry a décidé qu'il voulait jouer de la guitare, alors Jaco s'est mis au piano et moi à la basse et on a joué pendant pas mal de temps. Sa mort m'a brisé le cœur; il était tellement gentil.”

Rick Danko “à Nashville, je faisais partie d'une section rythmique composée de cinq musiciens du nom de the Long Players. On apprenait comme départ un classique à finir, puis on engageait des chanteurs et on allait dans un club pour le jouer seulement une fois. On a fait à peu près 20 albums, des Beatles à Van Morrison en passant par les Stones et les Who. La plus grosse surprise fut d'apprendre les parties de Rick Danko avec le Band. Je l'avais toujours adoré, mais je le voyais surtout comme chanteur. Eh bah, c'est un bassiste fantastique, de ses choix pour les notes à la place qu'il leur choisit.”

Matériels

Basses avec le Boss Spector NS-2J custom short-scale (basse principale); ’07 Gretsch Thunder Jet; fretless ’65 Guild Starfire; ’60s Guild M-85; contrebasse allemande du 19ème siècle de marque inconnue

Basses on Magic ’63 Fender Jazz Bass, ’63 Fender Precision Bass with flats, Jerry Jones Longhorn, Brendan O’Brien’s ’64 P-Bass

Strings Pyramid Gold nickel flats, La Bella 0760M “Jamerson” flatwounds

Picks Dunlop Jazz 3XL, felt ukulele pick

Live Shure UHF M4 sans fil pour toutes les basses relié à un line mixer Ashly LX-308B, puis à un Radial J48 DI au système sonore central, suivi grâce à des oreillettes sans fil Sennheiser; un Hartke HA4000 head et 4200 Professional Series (baffles utilisées pour les soundchecks et comme moyen de contrôler le son grâce aux oreillettes, mais non-utilisées pour les concerts)

Studio Aguilar DB 680 tube preamp, Demeter SSC-1 Silent Cabinet (1x12), Ampeg B-15S 60-watt combo amp

Selected Discography

Avec Bruce Springsteen (all on Columbia)
Magic
The Rising
Tracks
Ghost of Tom Joad
Tunnel of Love
Live/1975–85
Born in the U.S.A.
The River
Darkness on the Edge of Town
Born to Run
The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle
Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J

Avec Little Steven & the Disciples of Soul
Men Without Women, EMI

Avec Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes
Messin’ With the Blues, Leroy Better Days, Impact

Avec Steve Forbert
Mission of the Crossroad Palms, Giant

Avec Ian Hunter
You’re Never Alone With a Schizophrenic, Razor and Tie

Avec Gary U.S. Bonds
Dedication/On the Line, Gott Discs

Avec Emmylou Harris
Brand New Dance, Reprise

Avec Delevantes
Long About That Time, Rounder

Avec Randy Scruggs (and Johnny Cash)
Crown of Jewels, Warner Bros

Avec Steve Earle
I Feel Alright, Warner Bros

Avec Billy Joe Shaver
The Earth Rolls On, New West

Avec Robert Earl Keen Jr.
A Bigger Piece of the Sky, Sugar Hill

Avec Sonny Burgess
Sonny Burgess, Rounder

Avec Paul Burlison
Train Kept a-Rollin’, Sweetfish

Avec Solomon Burke
Nashville, Shout Factory

Avec P.F. Sloan
Sailover, Hightone

Avec Sass Jordan
Get What You Give, Horizon

Avec Jim Lauderdale
Honey Songs, Yep Roc



Notes:

1 Number system: la musique de Nashville, donc principalement de la country, utilise un système de notation musicale différent du nôtre et de celui couramment employé dans les pays anglosaxons (qui, lui, emploie des lettres). Ce système informel et flexible est basé sur des chiffres allant de 1 à 7 sans indiquer le ton. Il est plus couramment appelé The Nashville Number System.

Merci à Laure, Petrarchs girlfriend!